Last chance to sign up for the Honduran Street Party race this week.

Last chance to sign up for the Honduran Street Party race this week.
3/20 – 3/26 this week in training
Monday= 6 pm TBH
Tuesday= Run 3 mile easy, Swim 100 warm-up, 4 x 50 fist drill, 4 x 50 paddles, 4 x 50 15 sec rest, 200 Bilateral cool down
Wednesday= Rest
Thursday= run 4 miles easy, 6 pm TBH, 7:15 pm Bike trainer 30 minutes easy cardio
Friday= packet pick up for the Honduran Street Party run Noon – 7 Pm Friday March 24th at the Residence at the Streets of St. Charles,
1650 Beale Street, St. Charles MO
6:30 pm Swim, 50 warm up, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 200, 150, 100, 50, 200 Bilateral cool down
Saturday= Honduran Street Party run 7:45 Picture at the start line,
8:30 am Race Start
Sunday= 10 am Bike Trainer Medium 45 minutes with 3 single leg 45 seconds, 3 cadence drills

Don’t base your decisions on the advice of those who don’t have to deal with the results.

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Remember to spring your clocks forward tonight one hour. This allows more hours of daylight in the evenings for training. It is now time to add the 3rd run workout to the training. Keep pushing yourself!
3/13 – 3/19 this week in training
Monday= 6 pm TBH
Tuesday= run 3 miles 5k pace, Swim 100 warm up, 4 x 50 fist drill, 4 x 50 paddles, 4 x 50 15 sec rest, 200 Bilateral cool down
Wednesday= Rest
Thursday= run 4 miles easy, 6 pm TBH, 7:15 pm Bike trainer 30 minutes easy cardio
Friday= Rest
Saturday= 8 am Swim, 50 warm up, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 200, 150, 100, 50, 200 Bilateral cool down
2 pm Bike Trainer Medium 45 minutes with 3 single leg 45 seconds, 3 cadence drills
Sunday = 9 am run 8 miles marathon pace to start negative split to half marathon finish

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Time to sign up

It is the last week to sign up for Honduran Street Party run before the price increase. Come out and beat the Pinata on the 10k or 5k course and you could win an extra prize. This is fast run course with a great celebration after the run. Highlight the link below, then click on it and get registered today. We are looking forward to seeing everyone at the run.

http://www.streetpartyrun.com/#register

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This week in training for the olympic triathlon and half marathon

It was a good week of training. Thanks to Rene, Dave and Dawn for making swim a fun one. Thanks to Kim for a good bike trainer ride and I got to give her a free adjustment on bike fit. Looking forward to seeing everyone at tomorrow’s 10 mile and 10am all paces welcome.

3-6 – 3/12 This week in training
Monday= 6 pm TBH
Tuesday= Swim 100 warmup, 4 x 50 fist drill, 4 x 50 paddles, 4 x 50 sprint 15 sec rest, 300 slow increasing to sprint finish, 100 easy bi lateral breathing,
Wednesday= run 4 miles easy
Thursday= 6 pm TBH, Bike trainer 30 minutes easy cardio
Friday= Rest
Saturday= 8 am Swim, 50 warm up, 100, 150, 200, 250, 200, 150, 100, 50,
2 pm Bike Trainer Medium 45 minutes with 4 single leg 45 seconds and 4 cadence spins 45 seconds
Sunday= 10 am run 10 miles easy marathon pace to start; then every mile butt kick for 10 leading into half marathon pace to ¾ of mile, then recover at marathon pace.

NOTICE: If you are short on time, just cut everything in half

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MO Cowbell marathon and half marathon

If you have not registered for the MO Cowbell marathon or half marathon. Today is the day if you want the cheapest price. There is a price increase tonight so enter today and save the cash. Endurance Madness has a group training for the marathon and half marathon if your interested in group training.
The link below will get you there.

http://mocowbellmarathon.com/register/registration/

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Upcoming Events

Endurance Madness is excited to announce being the swim coach on duty July 29th in the St. Louis Endurance Open Water Series. Please consider coming out to support Endurance Madness and St. Louis Endurance Open Water Series. The link below includes three great events by the premier race promoters from St. Louis, MSE Racing. Endurance Madness is currently training for Saint Louis Triathlon and for Equinox Half Marathon. We support these events and if you want to join us, all paces and experience levels are welcome. Come on out to a workout and get to meet new friends and future family.
Endurance Madness
Bob Boles CPT GPTS

http://mseracing.com/

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This week in Training

8 weeks to Try Tri, 9 weeks to Rec Plex Triathlon, 12 short weeks to St. Louis Triathlon, Motivation is catching, Drive is building, and Goals are set, Triathlon training is now and real! The biggest bonus is you get the training plan FREE just for being a part of Endurance Madness. If anyone wants more of a one on one coaching, please contact me directly.
Thank you
Bob Boles

2/27 – 3/5 This week in training
Monday= 6 pm TBH
Tuesday= Swim 100 warmup, 4 x 50 fist drill, 4 x 50 paddles, 4 x 50 15 sec rest, 300 slow increasing to sprint finish, 100 easy bi lateral breathing,
Wednesday= run 4 miles easy
Thursday= 6 pm TBH, Bike trainer 30 minutes easy cardio
Friday= Rest
Saturday= 8 am Swim, 50 warm up, 100, 150, 200, 250, 200, 150, 100, 50,
2 pm Bike Trainer Medium 45 minutes with 3 single leg 45 seconds
Sunday= 10 am run 9 miles easy marathon pace

NOTICE: times are not listed on the workouts that I do not host, remember to get it in on your own, which will get you ready for this season. If you are training for a run up to a half marathon or a triathlon up to an Olympic distance, this plan will get you there pushing for a PR.

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When To Climb In A Seated Or Standing Position

When To Climb In A Seated Or Standing Position

For many newer triathletes, finding the best riding position during an uphill can be a trial-and-error process. For long hills with a mild grade or quick up-and-over rollers, you can maintain a faster speed by staying in the aero position. But when and why does it make sense to switch to an upright or standing position for a climb?

Seated: At some point, the aerodynamic benefits of being in aero are outweighed by the increased power production and comfort that come from climbing upright or standing. The commonly cited speed in which this becomes a wash is about 12 mph. Most cyclists can generate more power when seated, so sitting up to pedal when you’re going slower than 12 mph makes sense.

Standing: If the grade becomes very steep and you’re unable to turn over a reasonable cadence (60 RPM or lower) then it’s time to think about standing. Standing allows you to generate a little more power by leveraging your weight. If you’re smaller and have less muscle mass, you might need that leverage sooner.

However, standing also usually leads to heavier breathing and higher heart rates. If you’re tackling a shorter hill and don’t mind putting in a variable effort (think hard group ride), standing for a brief period will help you get to the top more easily.

Spiking up your heart rate by getting out of the saddle in a long race, though, can quickly lead to fatigued legs. The place for standing in a long steady effort race is when you need to temporarily change up muscle recruitment patterns after being stuck in the same position for a long time. A quick bout of standing while keeping the same effort level can feel like a break.

Read more at http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/08/training/when-to-climb-in-a-seated-or-standing-position_123095#h4pFvGCz6ecgRXZc.99

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Freestyle Basics: The 3 Phases of the Pull

In triathlon, speed is the name of the game. Unlike cycling and running, swimming is a bit counter-intuitive in the sense that applying more power doesn’t necessarily guarantee you speed in the water. Herein lies the most uniquely difficult piece of the freestyle formula—the pull.

On average, the pull attributes up to 90 percent of total propulsion in freestyle. Breaking down the pull into three phases will help you better understand the transfer of power from overhead to the back of the stroke.

The Catch
Freestyle starts at the front of the stroke, and how you posture your arm before you begin the pull is vital. This positioning will dictate exactly how much water you’re able to “hold” and your overall ability to recruit the proper muscles throughout all three phases.

For starters, let’s discuss what the profile of the arm should look like at the front of the stroke. As you slice your recovering arm into the water, you want to maintain a slope, with your fingertips below your wrist and your wrist below your elbow. This kinetic chain sets you up for a high elbow catch. From a side view, the extended arm’s fingertips may be seven to 10 inches below the waterline, while the elbow may be three to six inches submerged. It’s most helpful to visualize these measurements as a loose gauge, as each swimmer’s range of motion is different.

The transition from full arm extension to a loaded, bent arm position is the most delicate aspect of your pull. The key here is to think smooth and controlled, as opposed to a fast whipping motion at the front of the stroke. If you’ve ever felt that S-shaped motion at the early phases of your pull, this is indicative of your hand “slipping” through the water as it’s looking for a better hold on the water.

Imagine your elbow is the hinge on a door, and focus on keeping your upper arm lifted as you smoothly lower your forearm and hand down to a vertical position below your elbow and next to your head. At this phase, the angle between your forearm and upper arm should be between 60 to 90 degrees. Practice this internal shoulder rotation motion both on land with bands and in the water during one-arm freestyle sets. The more repetition, the better, as this is the origin of your power and connection with the water.

The Pull
This is the fun stuff, the tangible reward from the effort you put into your stroke. Similar to the delicate nature of the catch, the pull requires equal precision to maximize your speed. It’s now time to transition from the loading phase of the catch into the following two propulsive phases of the pull.

First, use your back. The shoulder muscles are the primary movers in the catch, but the lats (the back) are the primary movers of the pull. If you feel pain in the front head of your deltoids while pulling, this is a sign that the profile of your arm is too deep or dropped below you. If this is the case, commit to working on the catch until you’re able to maintain the lift in your arm necessary for a high elbow pull.

To help you visualize what muscles should be firing off during the pull, imagine squeezing a pillow between your upper arm and lats. Keep this in mind as you pull your arm back past your head towards your hips. Same as with the catch, stay smooth and controlled when applying force throughout this motion. If you move too quickly through this pathway, you’re likely to feel a slip or loss of traction on the water.

The goal is to pull a nearly linear pathway along the frame of your body. Again, practice with a one-arm freestyle drill—slow your stroke rate and isolate your focus on the pull.

The Push
The push is the final phase of the pull and the most powerful aspect of the freestyle stroke. In an effort to increase turnover (cadence) for open water swimming, many athletes cut the finish of their stroke short, thus creating a shorter or quicker stroke cycle. Unfortunately, untapped power potential is left on the table when doing this.

The push begins once you send your hand backward, past your elbow. Visually, it’s the final extension of the arm before your hand exits the water at the back of the stroke. From the beginning of the catch to the finish of the push, it’s helpful to imagine progressively building power and speed throughout these three phases.

Continuing the linear pathway along the frame of your body, your hand should exit the water in the middle of your hip. For most, this would be around the bottom of your pocket on a pair of jeans. Allow the outside of your thumb to lightly brush the bottom of your “jeans pocket” each stroke until you’ve found that sweet spot.

If you’re familiar with gym equipment, the final motion of the push is comparable to a tricep pushdown on the cable machine. You’re continuing to recruit muscles on the backside of your body, but primarily your triceps. You don’t want to hyperextend your arm at the end of the stroke, but rather finish with a micro-bend to the elbow. This will land your hand at the point on your “pocket” that we discussed. This phase of the stroke demands conscious repetition and focus, as it’s easy to forget when trying to push the pace in a squad or race environment.

Be patient with yourself as you practice these mechanical changes. Remember, repetition is necessary to ingrain changes in freestyle.
Thanks to ACTIVE.COM for the article.

“http://www.active.com/triathlon/articles/freestyle-basics-the-3-phases-of-the-pull?page=2”

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Getting around a corner in an efficient and safe manner

Ironman champion Chris Lieto, one of the greatest cyclists triathlon has seen, has created a series of training videos with the goal of giving you a simplified approach to getting the most out of your bike training. Here, Lieto shares his advice for getting around a corner in an efficient and safe manner. Sign up for more free tips from Chris on the Master the Bike website.
Read more at http://triathlon.competitor.com/2016/07/video/master-bike-chris-lieto-cornering-skills_134276#vKYr3oL5rdE2RBS4.99

Master The Bike With Chris Lieto: Cornering Skills

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